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Series Theme: FRAMEWORKS: Song of Songs

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FRAMEWORKS: Song of Solomon 6:

 

Preliminary Comments: Please ensure you have read the notes in the Introduction. Very well, to begin with, the study which simply seeks to help the reader absorb the text more easily:

 

Possible breakdown :

v.1 The chorus challenge about how much she knows about her love's whereabouts

v.2-3 She suggests he has gone to the gardens

v.4-13 He describes her extensively [the second time] and chides the chorus

 

 

Friends

 

v.1 [so OK, you ought to know, where did he go?] Where has your beloved gone,
    most beautiful of women?
Which way did your beloved turn,
    that we may look for him with you?

 

She

 

v.2 [I think he's gone into the palace garden] My beloved has gone down to his garden,
    to the beds of spices,
to browse in the gardens
    and to gather lilies.
v.3  [there we've been together before and he enjoyed me] I am my beloved's and my beloved is mine;
    he browses among the lilies.

 

He

 

v.4  [(Ah, here you are) my outstanding beautiful bride] You are as beautiful as Tirzah, my darling,
    as lovely as Jerusalem,
    as majestic as troops with banners.
v.5  [look away for I am overwhelmed when you look at me] Turn your eyes from me;
    they overwhelm me.
[your beautiful hair cascades down] Your hair is like a flock of goats
    descending from Gilead.
v.6 [again I say, your teeth as you smile are exquisite] Your teeth are like a flock of sheep
    coming up from the washing.
Each has its twin,
    not one of them is missing.
v.7 [just above your veil your forehead tells me of your beauty] Your temples behind your veil
    are like the halves of a pomegranate.
v.8  [There may be many queens or concubines….] Sixty queens there may be,
    and eighty concubines,
    and virgins beyond number;
v.9 [… but you stand out uniquely] but my dove, my perfect one, is unique,
    the only daughter of her mother,
    the favourite of the one who bore her.
The young women saw her and called her blessed;
    the queens and concubines praised her.

 

Friends

 

v.10  [So who do we see coming in such glory?] Who is this that appears like the dawn,
    fair as the moon, bright as the sun,
    majestic as the stars in procession?

 

He

 

v.11 [I went about my business but before I knew it I was on my chariot] I went down to the grove of nut trees
    to look at the new growth in the valley,
to see if the vines had budded
    or the pomegranates were in bloom.
v.12  Before I realised it,
    my desire set me among the royal chariots of my people.

 

Friends

 

v.13 [Beautiful woman stay so we can see your beauty] Come back, come back, O Shulammite;
    come back, come back, that we may gaze on you!

 

He

 

[don't you watchers demean my love] Why would you gaze on the Shulammite
    as on the dance of Mahanaim?

 

[Concluding Comment: For the first time there is a tenuous suggestion that he might be Solomon. See v.8 about queens etc. but this may be him saying, “Solomon may have all his queens and concubines, but I've got the best- you!” Verse 12 is also enigmatic about royal chariots but ‘my people' may just mean ‘the Jews'. Again a chapter about locations and activities. Note in this chapter the second question, “Who is this?” 6:10, the answer of which is not clear – just the lover whoever he is. Twice in this chapter, in verse 13, she is called a Shulammite, an unknown name.]

 

And now the drama:

   

The Text: The Drama

FRIENDS

6 1 Where has your lover gone, most beautiful of women? Which way did your lover turn, that we may look for him with you?

 

(The chorus replies)

Very well, so which way did he go when you last saw him. Tell us and we will look with you.

 

SHE

2 My lover has gone down to his garden, to the beds of spices, to browse in the gardens and to gather lilies. 3 I am my lover's and my lover is mine; he browses among the lilies.

 

(She turns to them)

I think he's possibly gone to his gardens – possibly he may go looking to others if he feels I have rejected him – but I am his and he IS mine, wherever he is, whatever he is doing!

(the lights dim)

 

 

 

HE

4 You are beautiful, my darling, as Tirzah, lovely as Jerusalem,

majestic as troops with banners.

 

 

5 Turn your eyes from me; they overwhelm me.

 

 

Your hair is like a flock of goats descending from Gilead.

6 Your teeth are like a flock of sheep coming up from the washing.

Each has its twin, not one of them is alone.

7 Your temples behind your veil are like the halves of a pomegranate.

8 Sixty queens there may be, and eighty concubines, and virgins beyond number; 9 but my dove, my perfect one, is unique, the only daughter of her mother, the favorite of the one who bore her. The maidens saw her and called her blessed; the queens and concubines praised her.

(as the lights come back up we find the man alone on stage, striding around.)

“What shall I say to her? How shall I convince her of my love?

You are beautiful, my love, more beautiful than the beloved cities of my land. Don't look at me with reproach, my love, you overwhelm me and I cannot cope with it.

What can I say of you? Nothing is sufficient.

You dark hair falling over your shoulders reminds me of my dark goats as they pour down the hillside roads. Your pure white teeth remind me of my freshly washed flocks. As I imagine you on our wedding day, the roundness of your forehead behind the veil is as smooth as a perfect pomegranate. No, that is not enough!

I have women without number than I can choose from, throughout the world, but you my gentle one are unique. All women extol you. What more can I say?

 

FRIENDS

10 Who is this that appears like the dawn, fair as the moon, bright as the sun, majestic as the stars in procession?

 

(the chorus speaks up)

Who is this who speaks this way of her, this one who comes like the morning star, clear as the moon, bright as the sun and whose majesty leads all others in his train?

 

HE

11 I went down to the grove of nut trees to look at the new growth in the valley, to see if the vines had budded or the pomegranates were in bloom.

12 Before I realized it, my desire set me among the royal chariots of my people.

 

(he turns to face the audience)

After I left her I went to inspect my plantations, to see the new growth. An anger stirred in me and so off I went with my bodyguards in my chariot, letting off steam in the exhilaration of the race.

 

FRIENDS

13 Come back, come back, O Shulammite; come back, come back, that we may gaze on you!

 

(the chorus again)

Come back Solomon's girl, come back to be seen, remind us of your beauty.

 

HE

Why would you gaze on the Shulammite as on the dance of Mahanaim?

(he turns to the chorus)

Why should you want to see her – she's mine. She's not a spectacle for gawping at.

 

Continue to Songs 7