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Series Theme: FRAMEWORKS: Leviticus

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FRAMEWORKS: Leviticus 2: The Grain Offering

 

Context:

 

1:3-17

BURNT OFFERING

2:1-16

GRAIN OFFERING

3:1-16

FELLOWSHIP OFFERING

4:1- 5:13

SIN OFFERING

5:14 - 6:7

GUILT OFFERING

 

v.1-3 The Basics of the Grain Offering
v.4-8 Different forms of the Offering
v.9,10 Divided Use of the Offering
v.11-16 Prohibitions & Additives

 

 

v.1-3 The Basics of the Grain Offering

 

v.1 “‘When anyone brings a grain offering to the Lord, their offering is to be of the finest flour. They are to pour olive oil on it, put incense on it

v.2 and take it to Aaron's sons the priests. The priest shall take a handful of the flour and oil, together with all the incense, and burn this as a memorial [or representative] portion on the altar, a food offering, an aroma pleasing to the Lord.

v.3 The rest of the grain offering belongs to Aaron and his sons; it is a most holy part of the food offerings presented to the Lord.

 

[Notes: Called a Grain Offering (or Cereal Offering) it was again a voluntary offering and although seen here as a distinct offering in its own right, in Num 15 it is instructed to be used as part of the burnt offering of an animal. Its primary ingredient is grain ground to fine flour which has both oil and incense added, presumably the oil to bind it together and incense to increase the aroma. Only a part of it is burnt and the rest given to the priests for food. The idea of the ‘memorial' portion must surely suggest that first and foremost it remembers God, is given with Him in mind, and only secondarily for the priests.]

 

 

v.4-8 Different forms of the Offering

 

v.4 “‘If you bring a grain offering baked in an oven, it is to consist of the finest flour: either thick loaves made without yeast and with olive oil mixed in or thin loaves made without yeast and brushed with olive oil.

v.5 If your grain offering is prepared on a griddle, it is to be made of the finest flour mixed with oil, and without yeast.

v.6 Crumble it and pour oil on it; it is a grain offering.

v.7 If your grain offering is cooked in a pan, it is to be made of the finest flour and some olive oil.

v.8 Bring the grain offering made of these things to the Lord; present it to the priest, who shall take it to the altar.

 

[Notes: The three different forms all require it to be cooked to produce an edible food for the priests.]

 

 

v.9,10 Divided Use of the Offering

 

v.9 He shall take out the memorial portion from the grain offering and burn it on the altar as a food offering, an aroma pleasing to the Lord.

v.10 The rest of the grain offering belongs to Aaron and his sons; it is a most holy part of the food offerings presented to the Lord.

 

[Notes: As we noted above the small portion burnt on the altar is to remember that God is to be put first and again the imagery is of the aroma wafting up to God to convey the intent of pleasing Him. The rest is a means of blessing the priests.]

 

 

v.11-16 Prohibitions & Additives

 

v.11 “‘Every grain offering you bring to the Lord must be made without yeast, for you are not to burn any yeast or honey in a food offering presented to the Lord.

v.12 You may bring them to the Lord as an offering of the first-fruits, but they are not to be offered on the altar as a pleasing aroma.

v.13 Season all your grain offerings with salt. Do not leave the salt of the covenant of your God out of your grain offerings; add salt to all your offerings.

v.14 “‘If you bring a grain offering of first-fruits to the Lord, offer crushed heads of new grain roasted in the fire.

v.15 Put oil and incense on it; it is a grain offering.

v.16 The priest shall burn the memorial portion of the crushed grain and the oil, together with all the incense, as a food offering presented to the Lord.

 

[Notes: The prohibitions are to exclude yeast or honey, yeast perhaps as the distinguishing element that causes the natural loaf to change (rise) so the cooked flour is a very basic cake or biscuit without any possibility of competition to see which cook could produce the best. Honey excluded possibly because it was a common material that pagans offered to their gods, or maybe another material that could change the taste and create human competition of ‘cake making'. There was to be nothing of this before God.

Having said that it was not to be merely bland flour and oil cooked but also to have the incense to please God but also salt to make it more interesting or palatable for the priests. No doubt some will find spiritual pictures in all these materials.

In addition we should note that the practicalities for the priests, how to go about their part in this offering, are laid out in 6:14-23

Chapters 1 & 2 describe the two main types of offering – animals or grain – while the following chapters describe FUNCTIONS of offerings – for fellowship, to acknowledge sin, and to acknowledge specific guilt for specific offences.]

   

 

CONTINUE TO CHAPTER 3